Celine Dion Suffers Seizures Amid Her Battle With Stiff Person Syndrome; Know About The Autoimmune Disorder

In a recent video, Celine Dion is seen suffering an intense seizure amid her battle Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS). SPS is a rare autoimmune neurological disorder which causes muscle stiffness and painful spasms that come and go. The condition can also worsen over time. Read on to know more about the disorder.
Celine Dion Suffers Seizures Amid Her Battle With Stiff Person Syndrome

Celine Dion Suffers Seizures Amid Her Battle With Stiff Person Syndrome (Picture credit: Instagram/ Celine Dion)

Celine Dion released footage of her going through an intense seizure as she battles Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS). This footage is part of the documentary titled I Am: Celine Dion wherein the singer and performer experiences unbearable pain and it leaves her paralysed for a while.
During the 10-minute seizure, Dion is seen lying on a massage table and her body continues to spasm. Sports medicine therapist Terrill Lobo says, “Part of the disease is that as soon as you go into a contraction, sometimes … the signal to release it, doesn't understand, so it ends up just staying in a contracted position.”
Dion wanted the footage to be kept in the documentary as she aimed to raise awareness about the autoimmune neurological disorder. The Grammy award-winning singer has been experiencing symptoms for the past 17 years, however, it was only in 2022 when she was diagnosed with the condition.

What is Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS)?

This is a rare autoimmune neurological disorder which causes muscle stiffness and painful spasms that come and go. The condition can also worsen over time. While there’s no treatment that can help cure the condition, you can work with your doctor to manage the symptoms. Johns Hopkins Medicine says that SPS most commonly develops in people ages 40 to 50, but in rare cases, it occurs in children and older adults. SPS is thought to affect one to two people in a million.

Symptoms of Stiff Person Syndrome

SPS usually causes painful muscle contractions and spasms that often begin in the legs and back. These spasms can also affect the abdomen and the upper trunk, arms, neck and face. Here, take a look at some of the symptoms of SPS.
  • Difficulty walking, and the person might space the feet wide to feel more steady
  • Stiff or rigid posture due to ongoing spasms in the back or trunk
  • Unsteadiness and falling because of sudden spasms, which can lead to injuries
  • Shortness of breath if SPS affects muscles in the chest
  • Chronic pain
  • Excess curve in the lower back due to muscle tightness and changes in the spine alignment
  • Anxiety and agoraphobia

Risk factors of Stiff Person Syndrome

According to Cleveland Clinic, women and people assigned female at birth (AFAB) are twice as likely to have stiff person syndrome as men and people assigned male at birth (AMAB). Other autoimmune conditions might also cause SPS. These include:
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease
  • Vitiligo
  • Pernicious anaemia
  • Celiac disease.

Managing Symptoms of Stiff Person Syndrome

While there’s no cure for SPS, treatment can help reduce the severity of symptoms. Here, take a look at some of the ways to manage the symptoms.

Medications for Symptoms

Certain medicines can help reduce spasms, stiffness and pain. These include:
  • Oral muscle relaxers
  • Oral medications that are not muscle relaxers but that have some effect on the GABA neurotransmitter
  • Botulinum toxin.

Medications for the Immune System

Immune therapies can help to modify or suppress the immune system. These include:
  • Intravenous or subcutaneous immunoglobulin
  • Plasma exchange
  • Intravenous immunosuppressant therapy
  • Oral immunosuppressant therapy.

Other Treatments to Manage Symptoms

Some of the other ways to manage the symptoms of SPS as suggested by Johns Hopkins Medicine are:
  • Physical therapy
  • Aquatic therapy
  • Heating pads
  • Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation
  • Stretching
  • Osteopathic manipulation
  • Qi gong
  • Chiropractic treatments
  • Massage
  • Yoga
  • Acupuncture
  • Acupressure
  • Pilates training
  • Cognitive behavioural therapy.
End of Article
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news