Hyderabad doctors Remove 3.5-cm Long Mutton Bone Stuck Near Heart In Elderly Man

Doctors from a Hyderabad hospital successfully removed a 3.5-cm-long mutton bone lodged in the esophagus of an elderly patient, which led to the development of esophageal ulcers. According to doctors, the endoscopy procedure saved the man's life after the bone had pierced the esophageal wall very close to the heart. Read on to know more about the procedure.
Endoscopy surgery

Doctors said the stuck bone was causing severe complications for over a month and led to the formation of esophageal ulcers

In a challenging surgery, doctors in Hyderabad removed a mutton bone lodged in the esophagus of an elderly patient. Doctors said the bone was causing severe complications for over a month and led to the formation of esophageal ulcers.
This complex procedure was performed endoscopically, avoiding the need for major surgery, the hospital said in a statement. According to doctors from LB Nagar Kamineni Hospital, a 66-year-old resident of Kakkiren village had a 3.5-cm long mutton bone stuck in the lower part of his throat due to his inability to chew food properly, as he lacks teeth.
The man experienced chest pain and a few days later went to the local village doctor, who misdiagnosed the issue as a gastric problem. However, despite being treated for indigestion, when his pain increased, the patient went for a detailed check-up where his condition was detected. “Due to the prolonged presence of the impacted bone, which had pierced the esophageal wall very close to the heart, it caused ulcers. The bone's proximity to the pericardium required meticulous handling during the endoscopic procedure to avoid further complications,” said Dr. Radhika Nittala, Consultant Medical Gastroenterologist.
“Had the bone not been removed in time, the ulcer would have completely pierced the esophagus causing perforation and necessitating major surgery. We managed to avert these risks through careful endoscopic maneuvering during its removal,” she added.

Why is endoscopy performed?

Endoscopy is a procedure used to visually examine your upper digestive system, done with the help of a tiny camera on the end of a long, flexible tube. A specialist in diseases of the digestive system uses an endoscopy to diagnose and sometimes treat conditions that affect the upper part of the digestive system. According to doctors, the procedure is done to diagnose and treat conditions that affect the upper part of the digestive system, which includes the esophagus, stomach, and beginning of the small intestine. The doctor may recommend an endoscopy procedure to:

Investigate symptoms

An endoscopy can help determine what is causing digestive signs and symptoms, such as heartburn, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, difficulty swallowing, and gastrointestinal bleeding.

Diagnose

The procedure offers an opportunity to collect tissue samples to test for diseases and conditions that may be causing anemia, bleeding, inflammation, or diarrhoea. It can also detect some cancers.

Treat

Special tools are passed through the endoscope to treat problems in your digestive system. Many endoscopes are used with a technology called narrow-band imaging. Narrow band imaging uses special light to help better detect precancerous conditions, such as Barrett's esophagus.

What happens during endoscopy?

According to health experts, as the endoscope travels down your esophagus:
A tiny camera at the tip transmits images to a video monitor in the exam room. The doctor would then look at his monitor to find out anything out of the ordinary in your upper digestive tract. If something unusual is found in your digestive tract, images can be taken for later examination.
Gentle air pressure is then fed into your esophagus to inflate your digestive tract, which allows the endoscope to move freely. It also allows the folds of your digestive tract to be examined more easily.
The doctor will pass special surgical tools through the endoscope to collect a tissue sample or remove a polyp. This is done with the help of a video monitor to guide the tools.
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