Denmark Bans Spicy Korean Noodles, Would You Dare Try These 8 Hottest Dishes?

Denmark has recently banned spicy Korean noodles due to health concerns. If you're a fan of intense heat and culinary adventure, discover these eight hottest dishes from around the world. Each dish promises a fiery experience that will challenge even the most seasoned spice enthusiasts.
iStock-1976621637

A spicy Korean noodle has been banned in Denmark for being too spicy.

India is known for its love of spices, and for making every bite as fiery hot as possible (and loving the burn), but for some countries, spiciness is proving to be a health problem. In Denmark, a spicy Korean noodle brand has recently been banned because the spice levels are so high they believe it posing a risk of poisoning.
The noodles, often eaten as part of spicy food challenges were deemed to have too much capsacin and the country has begun the process of recalling the packages. Capsaicin is the chemical compound in chillies which creates the illusion of heat. The capsaicin molecules bind to receptors on our tongues which makes food taste spicy.
They particularly emphasised the warning that it wasn’t safe for children advising people to throw away packets they already had. It should be noted that the products meet all food safety criteria, and this appears to be triggered simply by the spice level of the noodles. Additionally, this is the only country the noodles have been banned in till date.
The internet is having mixed reactions with people wondering whether these spicy noodles actually pose a health risk, or whether the Danish just have a particularly low tolerance to spice. If you’d like to test out your own, here are 8 of the world’s hottest dishes you can practice on.

Buldak

Originally, this South Korean dish from Incheon referred to ‘hot chicken’, a combination of chicken tenders or chunks in a fiery chilli sauce, often topped with cheese. It was the inspiration of the noodle brand behind the aforementioned ban and has become a worldwide household name.

Saoji Chicken Curry

India has plenty of ‘spicy’ dishes, from the fiery flavours of Naga curries made with bhut jolokia to the blazing red Laal Maas of Rajasthan. But the Saoji cuisine of Nagpur is known for being among the country’s hottest. Although Andhra cuisine could give it a fair fight.

Sichuan Hot Pot

This Chineese sharing pot, also known as Chongqing hot pot is filled with a flavourful broth to dip meats and vegetables, but comes with the deadly base of Sichuan peppercorns and chilli paste. Sichuan pepper is renowned for causing a tingly, numbing sensation from its spiciness.

Phall

Originating as a challenge from Bangladeshi-run restaurants in Birmingham Englans, this outrageous dish can contain as many as 10-12 types of chillies including bhut jolokia, Thai bird’s eye chillies and scotch bonnet. It wasn’t even created with a flavour in mind, its only purpose is pain.

Doro Wat

The fiery Ethiopian spice blend, berbere – aromatic with chile peppers, basil, cardamom, garlic, and ginger – is crucial to the flavour of doro wat, Ethiopia's beloved spicy chicken stew. Topped with boiled eggs, this dish is often served at weddings, religious holidays, and other special occasions.
iStock-1201356528
Ayam Betutu

Ayam Betutu

Popular on the Indonesian islands of Bali and Lombok, this whole chicken dish is stuffed with an aromatic spice paste (betutu) made from fresh hot chile peppers, galangal, candlenuts, shallots, garlic, turmeric, shrimp paste, and other ingredients. The chicken is wrapped in banana leaves and steamed to enhance the flavours.

Camarones a la Diabla

Tellingly translating to ‘the Devil’s shrimp, in this Mexican dish, juicy shrimp are spiced with a thick sauce made from dried guajillo and arbol chillies. Despite its simplicity, there are many variations found at Tex-Mex restaurants, including those with barbecue sauce, habanero salsa, or chipotle peppers.

Papa A La Huancaina

This Peruvian dish, served cold, looks deceptively mild. However, the key feature of papa a la huancaina is its fiery yellow sauce, made from aji amarillo chile peppers and queso fresco. Originating from the Huancayo region to feed railway workers, this potato dish's creamy, spicy sauce is also popular as a dip for fried yuca and quail eggs.
End of Article
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news