Selena Gomez Reminds Us To Get On Digital Detox

While social media and the internet play crucial roles in our lives, it's essential to acknowledge their potential to negatively impact our mental health. Despite their importance, we must recognize that these platforms can wreak havoc on our well-being. Digital detox might be the key to help us reduce the negative effects.
Selena Gomez Reminds Us To Get On Digital Detox
Singer Selena Gomez announced going off social media. This came in just few days followed after some fun (at least for the audience) viral moments from the Golden Globes that she shared with singer Taylor Swift.
Well, Selena isn't new to the concept of digital detox and in earlier instances has taken it. Selena has more than 429 million followers on Instagram and that has made her one of the most followed celebrities. She has spoken about the benefits of digital detox in many interviews. And in one such interview she said, "Taking a break from social media was the best decision that I’ve ever made for my mental health. I created a system where I still don‘t have my passwords. And the unnecessary hate and comparisons went away once I put my phone down."
Selena has become a digital detox superhero for all of us, inspiring us to take a break from social media. Yes, we know that for most it will be tough, but that's why it needs to be done. We all know the impact of social media on us. The toxicity of dealing with trolls, those videos of animal cruelty, and some of those time wasting videos, a digital detox is important for us.
For the unversed, digital detox is the time period in which you reduce the time spent online. That means you disconnect from social media, WhatsApp and in general being online. If you can, then just disconnect completely.
A study titled "No More FOMO: Limiting Social Media Decreases Loneliness and Depression" published in Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, monitored 143 undergraduates at the University of Pennsylvania. They were were randomly assigned to either limit Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat use to 10 minutes, per platform, per day, or to use social media as usual for three weeks. The results did show that the "limited use group showed significant reductions in loneliness and depression over three weeks compared to the control group. Both groups showed significant decreases in anxiety and fear of missing out over baseline, suggesting a benefit of increased self-monitoring."
So what would be the benefits of a digital detox? Firstly, the sleep cycle becomes better. You do become productive and feel better about yourself because you aren't comparing yourself to the fancy life displayed on Instagram. Research also reveals that less smartphone usage can lower your stress level.
You might struggle initially but the end result can be quite therapeutic. You do get out of the rat race. You don't realise but every post you put out there is to attract attention. It brings out this streak of being competitive, just because those likes show, how popular we are. It's not good for the mental health.
How many of us are comfortable to post pictures without numerous filters on social media? Very few? It will give you a chance to be in your own skin and not portray something which you aren't in reality. It does get tiring, no? To pretend and get validation. It will help you get over those insecurities and hang ups.
One of the worst things of social media is that you have no control on what content is popping up on your feed. We would think otherwise, but violence shown in some videos are brutal for your mental health. The world is cruel out there, we agree, but we can control not watching it by just being off it. The horrors don't have to be with us constantly 24/7. Just take that break.
Start with baby steps initially. Just set up a time limit of 1 hour every day. Or just getting on social media over the weekend. Delete all negative messages, trolling and even accounts that you follow. Any progress is good.
How many smartphone users are actively pursuing hobbies that they loved? It's time to get back to those hobbies and take a digital detox.
End of Article
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news