Airplane-Sized Asteroid 2024 FL3 Moving Towards Earth: NASA Shares Speed, Size, Distance, More

NASA has warned that a massive airplane-sized asteroid is set to make an alarmingly close distance towards Earth. Here are all the details.
asteroid

Asteroid 2024 FL3

Photo : BCCL
NASA has revealed that three asteroids have passed near Earth today. Two of them are said to be a massive 100-foot space rock. Thankfully, they have safely passed the Earth. Now, the US space agency, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has mentioned that there is a large airplane-sized asteroid which is set to make an uncomfortably close appearance to Earth. Ahead of its arrival, the space agency has revealed all the crucial details that you need to know. From speed, size, and distance to its potential threat - here is everything about the upcoming asteroid 2024 FL3.

Asteroid 2024 FL3 Key Details

Asteroid 2024 FL3 is comparable in size to an airplane, measuring approximately 100-foot in diameter. Despite its substantial dimensions, it will maintain a safe distance of 2.03 million miles from Earth. According to the US Space Agency, the asteroid is travelling in its orbit at a velocity of 34,575 kilometres per hour.
It is classified within the Apollo group of Near-Earth Asteroids, which includes space rocks with semi-major axes larger than Earth's orbit. These asteroids are named after the colossal 1862 Apollo asteroid, which was first discovered by German astronomer Karl Reinmuth in the 1930s.
Is it potentially hazardous? Thankfully not! NASA says that "an object larger than about 150 meters that can approach the Earth to within this (4.6 million miles) distance is termed a potentially hazardous object." Hence, due to its size, the Asteroid 2024 FL3 is not categorised as a potentially hazardous asteroid.

Do Asteroids Actually Strike Earth?

To a surprise, asteroids do actually strike Earth. However, the frequency of such events depends on the size of the asteroid. Small asteroids, known as meteoroids, frequently enter Earth's atmosphere but usually burn up completely before reaching the ground, resulting in what is commonly referred to as shooting stars or meteors. On the other hand, larger asteroids can survive atmospheric entry and impact the Earth's surface. Fortunately, most of these are small and burn up or disintegrate in the atmosphere. However, larger impacts can cause significant damage. Hence, NASA constantly keeps an eye on these dangerous space rocks.
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