Creating Sexually Explicit Deepfakes To Become A Criminal Offence In UK | Here's What New Law Says

In a step towards better protecting women from physical, emotional and online abuse, the UK government announces legislation to criminalize 'deepfakes'.
Creating Sexually Explicit Deepfakes To Become A Criminal Offence In UK | Here's What New Law Says

Creating Sexually Explicit Deepfakes To Become A Criminal Offence In UK | Here's What New Law Says

Photo : Times Now
London: The UK government announced on April 16 that the creation of sexually explicit "deepfake" images will be made a criminal offence in England and Wales.
Under the legislation, anyone responsible for making sexually explicit images without consent will face a criminal record and unlimited fine. If the image is shared more widely, offenders could then face jail time, the government said.
According to the legislation, anyone making a sexually explicit deepfake, even if there is no intent to share it, for wanting to cause alarm, humiliation, or distress will be committing an offence. If a person both creates and shares such images, they could be charged with two offences under the legislation.
Deepfake images have become more common in recent years, with images being viewed millions of times a month across the world, the UK Department of Justice said in a Press Release.
"The fake images and videos are made to look hyper-realistic with the victim usually unaware and unable to give their consent to being sexualised in such a way," it added.
The UK Minister for Victims and Safeguarding, Laura Farris, said, "The creation of deepfake sexual images is despicable and completely unacceptable irrespective of whether the image is shared."
"It is another example of ways in which certain people seek to degrade and dehumanise others - especially women. And it has the capacity to cause catastrophic consequences if the material is shared more widely. This government will not tolerate it," she added.
Talking about the message behind the legislation, Farris said that such material is "immoral, often misogynistic, and a crime".
The UK government said that the law prioritises to better protect women from "physical, emotional and online abuse".
"The government has also re-classified violence against women and girls as a national threat, meaning the police must prioritise their response to it," the Press Release said.
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