'Of Course, It...': Rishi Sunak On Allegations Of 'Islamophobia' Against His Party

Rishi Sunak denied that his governing party has Islamophobic tendencies, saying comments by Conservative lawmaker Lee Anderson were unacceptable.
Rishi Sunak defended his party against allegations of Islamophobia

Rishi Sunak defended his party against allegations of Islamophobia

London: UK Prime Minister Rishi Sunak on Monday defended his party against allegations of Islamophobia after row over a Tory MP’s remarks against London Mayor Sadiq Khan.
Anderson said on Friday the mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, was under the control of Islamists in widely condemned remarks that prompted the Conservatives to suspend him on Saturday.
Sunak denied that his governing party has Islamophobic tendencies, saying comments by Conservative lawmaker Lee Anderson were unacceptable.
Asked whether the party had Islamophobic tendencies, Sunak told BBC radio: “No, of course it doesn’t. I think it is incumbent on all of us, especially those elected to Parliament, not to inflame our debates in a way that is harmful to others,” he said.
"Lee's comments weren't acceptable. They were wrong, and that's why he's had the whip suspended," he added.
“Words matter, especially in the current environment where tensions are running high. I think it’s incumbent on all of us to choose them carefully.”
Khan has said he regarded Anderson's comments as racist and Islamophobic, and that they would "pour fuel on the fire of anti-Muslim hatred".
The row erupted in response to an article in ‘The Daily Telegraph’ by former home secretary Suella Braverman, who wrote that “the Islamists, the extremists and the anti-Semites are in charge” of the country.
“I don’t actually believe that these Islamists have got control of our country, but what I do believe is that they’ve got control of Khan, they’ve got control of London. He’s actually given our capital city away to his mates,” Anderson told ‘GB News’ in response to a question.
Following his suspension from the Conservative Party, Anderson refused to apologise for his comments, saying instead: “Following a call with the chief whip, I understand the difficult position that I have put both he and the prime minister in with regards to my comments. I fully accept that they had no option but to suspend the whip in these circumstances. However, I will continue to support the government’s efforts to call out extremism in all its forms – be that antisemitism or islamophobia."
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