Why Year 11s In UK Are in 'Crisis'? Research Sheds Light

A research by Nuffield Foundation has forecasted that COVID-19-related school closures have hampered children's socio-emotional and cognitive development at ages 5, 11, and 14. These setbacks are anticipated to have lasting repercussions, adversely affecting their future GCSE prospects and overall life outcomes.
UK School Classroom Representational

(Image: Unsplash/ Representational)

As the repercussions of COVID-19 school closures echo through the education sector, a sobering report by the Nuffield Foundation delivers a grim forecast for UK schools. With consecutive declines in GCSE results observed over the past two years across England, Wales and Northern Ireland, the report projects a continued downward trajectory until 2030.
The research forecasts that COVID-19-related school closures have hampered children's socio-emotional and cognitive development at ages 5, 11, and 14. These setbacks are anticipated to have lasting repercussions, adversely affecting their future GCSE prospects and overall life outcomes.
Educators in the UK have also reportedly confirmed a similar trend observed among the students. They said Year 11 students in the UK school systems, who are set to appear for the GCSE exams this year, are in a 'critical condition,' and they are attributing it to the Covid 19 lockdowns which forced closure of schools across the world.
Guardians of students currently in Year 11 who spoke to iTV News UK revealed a distressing pattern among learners. They reported that students lost interest in studies due to remote learning during the pandemic.
Justin, a 50-year-old businessman from Hertfordshire, told iTV News that his son William's struggles during the pandemic-induced school closures. William missed crucial school days, after COVID 19 caused school closure when he was in Year 7.
Upon returning in Year 9, he battled with self-doubt and low self-worth, impacting his academic motivation. Despite efforts to make new friends, William's confidence remained fragile. Key Stage 3, foundational for GCSEs, was disrupted for William, who lacked interest in online learning during lockdown. He is now in Year 11, which is a crucial juncture of his academic life, but due to the impact of school closure, his father says he is grossly unprepared for the GCSE exams.
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